Apple iPad and iPhone software update

Apple iPad and iPhone are getting a big software Update.. what does it mean for you

iOS11 (Apples new mobile Operating System) is on its way and it could mean some big new changes for you. Firstly, some devices will no longer be supported. This doesn’t mean that they will stop working but it does mean that they will no longer receive updates, and the same may go for the apps you use.

iOS11 will only support iPhone 5s and up and the iPad 4th Gen and Mini 2 and up. So if you have anything older you’re out of luck… and support.

For those of us that still have a supported device this is what we can expect to see in the last quarter of the year when iOS11 is released:

  • The App store has been redesigned, you’ll get daily listed around particular themes. There will also be tutorials explaining how to do things with new apps.
  • Control Centre, the Lock screen and Notifications also get a makeover.
  • The lock screen and notifications will now share the same screen and control centre has more slicers and some customisation options available.
  • The Message app is getting updated to include the ability to use Apple Pay to pay others via the messenger app.
  • There will also be new QuickType keyboard which will make typing with 1 hand better on iPhone and allow you to swipe up on a letter to get the corresponding number or symbol on that “key”
  • Siri will sound more natural in both the male and female voice and will be able to translate what you say in to German, French, Spanish and Chinese with more languages coming.
  • Siri will become more intelligent with “on-device” learning, meaning Siri will be able to do things like understand what you’re searching for in safari allowing it to suggest related words in other apps like mail etc
  • The camera will get a built in QR code scanner and other improvements.
  • Maps will get some great improvements including Speed notifications, and lane navigation. You’ll also get a new function called “Do Not Disturb While Driving”. When activated it will send people trying to contact you a note to say that youll see the message when you’ve finished driving.

The iPad is going to get its own improvements as well:

  • Better multitasking will allow you drag and drop pretty much anything between apps.
  • The new Dock will be accessible from any screen and will allow files to be pinned to it.
  • There is going to be a new Files app that will allow you to keep all your files in 1 easy to access location.

There are some awesome improvements coming so make sure you’re ready.. , come and talk to us about upgrading your iPad and for recommendations on your iPhone upgrade.

Go and see all the details here https://www.apple.com/nz/ios/ios-11-preview/

Two Factor Authentication

What is Two-Factor Authentication?

Ok to start with we thought we should explain the word “factor”, when we use the word “Factor” it means piece of information. So if a system requires two “factor” authentication it requires two pieces of information in order for you to access that system. An everyday example of two-factor authentication is EFTPOS: it has a PIN, and a card.

Most of the time the single factor would be a password, when you have other factors these could be a pin code, your fingerprint, or other biometric aspects such as your signature or a physical item such as a key, or a chipcard. Each additional factor makes it harder for someone to guess their way in.

Why would I implement this ..?

Some people are duped via email into typing their email username and password into webpages in order to allow them access to some sort of attachment… If a user enters their username and password into one of these “phishing” sites they will generally find that their email will be compromised and potentially used by hackers to spread all manner nasties to all of their contacts and more.

This is where 2 factor authentication comes in to save the day… If this user (the one that had entered their username and password in the Phishing page) had 2 factor authentication the “hacker” would require the other “factor” in order to access their email etc. As they would not have that, their email would still be safe and the hackers would get nothing!

How does it impact me when I am logging on ?

Once setup you won’t be bothered by your phone or by your desktop email software every time you open your email to read it.. we don’t want you getting frustrated by the process and if hackers have your phone or desktop computer you have far more serious issues to deal with..

It will only be when you access your email via a webpage or with a new device (the same way the hackers will be trying to get into your email) that the 2 factor authentication will kick in..

Why should you use it?

You’re already using it, every day, why not extend it to your personal and business data? At IT Engine, all staff are required to use two-factor authentication because we need to protect our data, our assets, and the data of our clients.

How can I implement this?

If your email is with Microsoft in office365 then this “2 factor authentication” can be setup by your IT team to be both effective and minimally intrusive.

Talk to us, chances are most of your systems have the capability to use two-factor authentication. It just needs to be turned on, and accompanied by some training to ensure a smooth transition.

Five sensible ideas for employee mobile phone use

Mobile phones can be good for business, but they also present challenges. These include security risks, inappropriate use and questions over data ownership. With a sensible policy you can mitigate the risks and reap the rewards.

Mobile management of staff is a complex area, since it combines business and personal issues. Mobile phones are highly personal devices. Studies have shown that some users would rather lose a partner than their phone! Yet phones are also useful, and sometimes essential, in the workplace.

If you provide work phones for your staff, or allow them to use their personal phones when at work, you need a clear policy on their use. Otherwise, each phone represents a huge risk and a big hole in your IT security strategy. Here are some ideas to get you started.

1. Make security a top priority. Explain the risks to your staff. Tell them what could happen if their phones are lost or compromised. Loss of company data, hacking, perhaps legal repercussions – all of these are possible. Ensure that all phones are PIN-protected at all times. Phones must not be jailbroken or rooted (hacked to run unauthorised apps). Explain that phones are powerful, portable computers that connect your central IT system to the outside world. They must be kept secure.

2. Use mobile management software. There are tools available that will let you see – and control – what users install on their phones. This is important because some apps contain malware that could compromise your entire network. Other mobile management tools allow you to locate stolen or missing phones. Remote wiping is also an option to prevent data being compromised.

3. Protect your investment. Phone cases are cheap but effective. Yes, a shiny new iPhone might be pretty to look at, but it’s not so pretty with a cracked screen! Phones are far more likely to be damaged without a case or cover to protect them. Think about insurance too: if a phone is lost or broken, who’s responsible? Who pays? This must all be decided in advance to avoid confusion.

4. Enforce phone etiquette. It’s not just about politeness, but data security too. Employees should leave meetings if they have to take a call or respond to texts. There should be restrictions on backing up personal data to work computers (30GB of iTunes content is an unnecessary network burden). Sometimes common sense is also a legal requirement – no employee should be using a phone while driving, for example.

5. Retain access to your firm’s data. If an employee leaves your company under a cloud, what happens to the data on their phone? Can you retrieve it? What if they were using their phone for company work? Who owns the data then? You need plans for these unfortunate possibilities.

Delia Gill of Wellington-based IT Engine advises companies to set out clear rules from the start. “Have a mobile phone policy, and make sure it covers all the bases,” she says. “Every employee should read it and sign that they accept its terms. Mobile phones are useful business tools, but only if they’re properly managed.”

If you don’t have a mobile phone policy, ask your IT provider for help in creating one. The sooner you act, the better.